newyorker:

A cartoon by Benjamin Schwartz. For more cartoons from the issue: http://nyr.kr/12QFZRl

newyorker:

A cartoon by Benjamin Schwartz. For more cartoons from the issue: http://nyr.kr/12QFZRl

776 notes

cheatsheet:

whitehouse:

You’ve probably heard of The Great Gatsby. But what about The Great Gatsby Curve?
It’s a pretty wonky chart that illustrates how rising inequality is jeopardizing our tradition of economic mobility for future generations.
So what does this mean? Kids of wealthy parents already have more opportunities to succeed than children of poor families—and this is likely to get worse unless we take steps to ensure that all children have access to quality education, health care, and other opportunities that give them a fair shot at economic success.
Learn more.

So we beat on, boats against the current, huh? 

cheatsheet:

whitehouse:

You’ve probably heard of The Great Gatsby. But what about The Great Gatsby Curve?

It’s a pretty wonky chart that illustrates how rising inequality is jeopardizing our tradition of economic mobility for future generations.

So what does this mean? Kids of wealthy parents already have more opportunities to succeed than children of poor families—and this is likely to get worse unless we take steps to ensure that all children have access to quality education, health care, and other opportunities that give them a fair shot at economic success.

Learn more.

So we beat on, boats against the current, huh? 

1,213 notes

newsweek:

Tumblr this morning. [h/t anne]

newsweek:

Tumblr this morning. [h/t anne]

488 notes

dark-rye:

Girl with the pearl earring. And patent flats.

dark-rye:

Girl with the pearl earring. And patent flats.

(Source: oculuspentacam)

181 notes

allcreatures:

“I remember stepping inside and being blown away by the birds,” Staples recounted. “They were gorgeous! And the show itself—the people, the smell, the sounds, the camaraderie of the shows and the beauty of the birds—who knew there were so many varieties of chickens beyond what you think about when they’re on your dinner plate?”

Staples’ love for the birds began during visits with her favorite relative, Uncle Ron, who lived in Athens, Ga., and was a chicken breeder. “I would go visit him and hang out behind his henhouse, and I started asking about chickens, and he invited me to that first poultry show 20 years ago,” said Staples.

With some guidance from her uncle, Staples began photographing the birds around the Midwest in Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio, and Indiana over four years to get enough material for her first book, The Fairest Fowl: Portraits of Championship Chickens, published by Chronicle Books in 2001. (click link below to read entire article)

  • Top: Bearded Buff Frizzle Polish Bantam hen.
  • Upper middle left: White Showgirl Bantam Cockerel
  • Upper middle right: Self Blue Bearded D’anvers Cockerel
  • Lower middle left: Blue Cochin Bantam Pullet
  • Lower middle right: Silver Duckwing Modern Game Large Fowl Hen
  • Bottom left: Black Langshan Cockerel
  • Bottom middle: White Leghorn Bantam Cock
  • Bottom right: Porcelain Belgian Bearded D’uccle Bantam Pullet.

All photos by Tamara Staples (via Tamara Staples: “The Magnificent Chicken” examines varieties of championship chickens (PHOTOS).)

998 notes

thedailywhat:

Create Your Own “Bokeh” Photographs

Here’s a cool trick you can try out with your SLR camera. All you need is a large aperture lens (ex: 50mm / F1.8) and a sheet of opaque paper or cardboard. The out-of-focus dots that you see in theimage are known as “Bokeh,” a term which is derived from the Japanese word meaning “blur.”
1) Create a fake lens hood with the paperboard by cutting out a hole in the shape of your choice.
2) Place the hood over the lens and see how it looks through the viewfinder.
3) Set your camera to its lowest aperture value or bulb exposure. Have fun!

thedailywhat:

Create Your Own “Bokeh” Photographs

Here’s a cool trick you can try out with your SLR camera. All you need is a large aperture lens (ex: 50mm / F1.8) and a sheet of opaque paper or cardboard. The out-of-focus dots that you see in theimage are known as “Bokeh,” a term which is derived from the Japanese word meaning “blur.”

1) Create a fake lens hood with the paperboard by cutting out a hole in the shape of your choice.

2) Place the hood over the lens and see how it looks through the viewfinder.

3) Set your camera to its lowest aperture value or bulb exposure. Have fun!

11,297 notes

ratsoff:


In Toronto, a vending machine that sells random books for $2 apiece.

(scribnerbooks.)

ratsoff:

In Toronto, a vending machine that sells random books for $2 apiece.

(scribnerbooks.)

30,218 notes

ilovecharts:

I am right there. I still don’t have a costume for HallowMEME tomorrow and I’ve spent all week being anxious that I have no good ideas while not doing the sensible thing and actually going to a costume place to look at things. HELP.

ilovecharts:

I am right there. I still don’t have a costume for HallowMEME tomorrow and I’ve spent all week being anxious that I have no good ideas while not doing the sensible thing and actually going to a costume place to look at things. HELP.

489 notes